How many electoral states are needed to win the presidency?

March 22, 2021 Off By idswater

How many electoral states are needed to win the presidency?

A candidate needs the vote of at least 270 electors—more than half of all electors—to win the presidential election. In most cases, a projected winner is announced on election night in November after you vote. But the actual Electoral College vote takes place in mid-December when the electors meet in their states.

What happens if no one gets 270?

A candidate must receive an absolute majority of electoral votes (currently 270) to win the presidency or the vice presidency. If no candidate receives a majority in the election for president or vice president, that election is determined via a contingency procedure established by the 12th Amendment.

When a candidate wins the popular vote in a state he gets all of that states electoral votes because of the quizlet?

What is this? States will select one elector within each congressional district based on the popular vote. The two senatorial votes (from the senate) are given to the winner of the state-wide popular vote.

Why do smaller states have more electoral college votes?

My analysis finds that voters in small states have more Electoral College votes per capita than larger, more diverse states, using several different measures – and therefore more power to choose a president than they would have in a national popular election. Ignoring smaller states?

What’s the minimum number of states you need to win the Electoral College?

Take a running total of the number of electoral votes, and stop at the point where you get 270 or more. So, theoretically, you can therefore win the Electoral College with these 11 states, if you disregard partisan tendencies. That’s the absolute minimum based on the 2010 census.

What’s the most electoral votes a candidate can win?

If you start at the top of the list and add up the number of electoral votes each state (plus D.C) has until you get to 270, we end up with 262 total electoral votes when we get down to Virginia, which is the 40th state in the list (including D.C. of course).

What’s the maximum number of States a candidate can win?

Note: Even though it isn’t a state, we’re considering the District of Columbia to be a state for this calculation because its three electoral votes count toward the 270 needed to win the Presidency. Therefore, the exact maximum number of states (including D.C.) that a Presidential candidate can win but still lose the election is 40.

My analysis finds that voters in small states have more Electoral College votes per capita than larger, more diverse states, using several different measures – and therefore more power to choose a president than they would have in a national popular election. Ignoring smaller states?

How does winner take all work in Electoral College?

This is because of the winner-take-all rule for choosing state electors, currently used by 48 states and Washington, DC. According to this rule, all electoral votes go toward the candidate that earns the most votes in the state’s general election; therefore, votes cast for any other candidate do not earn any of the state’s electoral votes.

If you start at the top of the list and add up the number of electoral votes each state (plus D.C) has until you get to 270, we end up with 262 total electoral votes when we get down to Virginia, which is the 40th state in the list (including D.C. of course).

Note: Even though it isn’t a state, we’re considering the District of Columbia to be a state for this calculation because its three electoral votes count toward the 270 needed to win the Presidency. Therefore, the exact maximum number of states (including D.C.) that a Presidential candidate can win but still lose the election is 40.