Why did the federal government relocate the Inuit?

February 6, 2021 Off By idswater

Why did the federal government relocate the Inuit?

Inuit houses in Resolute Bay, as they existed in 1956. Inuit were relocated by the Canadian government to exert their sovereignty over the High Arctic. A second group of families from Pond Inlet were relocated to Grise Fiord and Resolute Bay to help them adjust to the new environment.

Why did the Canadian government relocate Inuit families from northern Quebec to the High Arctic in 1953?

In the summer of 1953, the Canadian government relocated seven Inuit families from Northern Quebec to the High Arctic. They were promised an abundance of game and fish, with the assurance that if things didn’t work out, they could return home after two years.

Why were some Inuit people encouraged to relocate to Grise Fiord and Resolute Bay in the 1950s?

The families from Pond Inlet were included in the relocation because the government felt that they would be able to help the Itivimiut families adapt to a more northern environment. It is important to remember how different life in the High Arctic was from northern Quebec.

What happened to the Inuit culture?

By the 1940s, the government began to settle the Inuit in permanent communities, and the pressure to adapt to Western ways increased. The traditional ways were discarded and the Inuit became dependent on the government for education, health care, and other services.

What happened to the Inuit who were forced to move?

The communities in Grise Fiord and Qausuittuq remain active today. Some of the relocated Inuit have gone on to become respected leaders. Among them is John Amagoalik, one of the founders of the territory of Nunavut, who was five years old when his family was relocated to Grise Ford and Qausuittuq.

Which level of Government was responsible for relocating Inuit into permanent settlements?

The High Arctic relocation (French: La délocalisation du Haut-Arctique, Inuktitut: ᖁᑦᑎᒃᑐᒥᐅᑦᑕ ᓅᑕᐅᓂᖏᑦ, romanized: Quttiktumut nuutauningit) took place during the Cold War in the 1950s, when 92 Inuit were moved by the Government of Canada under Liberal Prime Minister Louis St. Laurent to the High Arctic.

How many Inuit people were relocated?

87 Inuit
Indian and Northern Affairs Minister John Duncan issued a formal apology Wednesday for the government’s controversial High Arctic relocation program, in which 87 Inuit were relocated about 1,200 kilometres to Canada’s most northerly settlements.

Who is the father of Nunavut?

Amagoalik
Amagoalik has been affectionately referred to as “John A.” and the “Father of Nunavut.” But his 25-year fight for Inuit rights was borne from tragedy and betrayal.

What is the religion of the Inuit?

Traditional Inuit religious practices include animism and shamanism, in which spiritual healers mediate with spirits. Today many Inuit follow Christianity, but traditional Inuit spirituality continues as part of a living, oral tradition and part of contemporary Inuit society.

When did the Inuit move to Ellesmere Island?

When Audlaluk and his family stepped off the C.D. Howe Arctic patrol vessel and onto Ellesmere Island, they found themselves struggling to survive in a completely new environment. Inuit houses in Resolute Bay, as they existed in 1956. Inuit were relocated by the Canadian government to exert their sovereignty over the High Arctic.

Where are the Inuit relocation sites in Canada?

This map illustrates the distance between relocation destinations from Inuit homes in Inukjuak. Grise Fiord, on the southern shores of Ellesmere Island, now Canada’s and Nunavut’s northernmost community, is about 2,000 km away from Inukjuak. South of that is Qausuittuq (Resolute Bay), on Cornwallis Island, approximately 1,934 km away from Inukjuak.

Why did the Canadian government move the Inuit?

While on the boat the families learned that they would not be living together but would be left at three separate locations. The Canadian government also moved the Inuit because they wanted to achieve Canadian sovereignty.

Why did the Inuit move to Pond Inlet?

Families from Pond Inlet were part of the relocation to help the families from northern Quebec adjust to life in the High Arctic. (Health Canada/Library and Archives Canada) But there were underlying motivations, such as stopping Greenlandic hunters who were poaching polar bears, and exerting Canadian sovereignty.

This map illustrates the distance between relocation destinations from Inuit homes in Inukjuak. Grise Fiord, on the southern shores of Ellesmere Island, now Canada’s and Nunavut’s northernmost community, is about 2,000 km away from Inukjuak. South of that is Qausuittuq (Resolute Bay), on Cornwallis Island, approximately 1,934 km away from Inukjuak.

Why did the Inuit move to Ellesmere Island?

The Department of Resources and Development, which oversaw Inuit affairs at the time, decided to populate Ellesmere and Cornwallis islands with Inuit, even though the areas were devoid of human population. Trade and economics also played a role in the relocations.

When did the Inuit move to Nunavut from Quebec?

The Inuit from Inukjuak, a community in northern Quebec, were moved to Grise Fiord and Resolute, in what is now Nunavut, in 1953 and 1956. Another three families from Pond Inlet, Nunavut, were also moved north to help the Inukjuaq families adjust to their new environment.

Another three families from Pond Inlet, Nunavut, were also moved north to help the Inukjuaq families adjust to their new environment. But Duncan said the transplanted families — commonly dubbed the “High Arctic Exiles” — did not get what the government of the day had promised them.