What article of the Constitution talks about the Electoral College?

February 3, 2021 Off By idswater

What article of the Constitution talks about the Electoral College?

Established in Article II, Section 1 of the U.S. Constitution, the Electoral College is the formal body which elects the President and Vice President of the United States.

What does Article 2 Section 2 Clause 2 of the Constitution mean?

He shall have Power, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, to make Treaties, provided two thirds of the Senators present concur; and he shall nominate, and by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, shall appoint Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls, Judges of the supreme Court, and all …

What power does Article 2 give the president?

What was the purpose of Article I Section 2?

Article I, Section 2 made the qualifications for voting in U.S. House elections the same as those for voting in the larger branch of the state legislature.

Is the Electoral College established in Article 2, Section 1?

The Electoral College established in Article II, Section I remains in effect, although it operates in a substantially different manner from what was originally envisaged.

Who are the electors in the Electoral College?

The Formation of the Electoral College. “Established in Article II, Section 1 of the U.S. Constitution, the Electoral College is the formal body which elects the President and Vice President of the United States. Each state has as many ‘electors’ in the Electoral College as it has Representatives and Senators in the United States Congress,…

What does Article 2, Clause 2 of the constitution say?

Article II, Section 1, Clause 2 of the U.S. Constitution opens by saying: “Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors.” This open-ended delegation of power to the states over the award of their Electoral votes creates a power in state legislatures that is “exclusive” and …

Is the Electoral College unenforceable under the Constitution?

“However, even if such promises of candidates for the electoral college are legally unenforceable because violative of an assumed constitutional freedom of the elector under the Constitution, Art. II, § 1, to vote as he may choose in the electoral college, it would not follow that the requirement of a pledge in the primary is unconstitutional.

The Electoral College established in Article II, Section I remains in effect, although it operates in a substantially different manner from what was originally envisaged.

What are the facts about the Electoral College?

Electoral College Fast Facts. Established in Article II, Section 1 of the U.S. Constitution, the Electoral College is the formal body which elects the President and Vice President of the United States.

Article II, Section 1, Clause 2 of the U.S. Constitution opens by saying: “Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors.” This open-ended delegation of power to the states over the award of their Electoral votes creates a power in state legislatures that is “exclusive” and

“However, even if such promises of candidates for the electoral college are legally unenforceable because violative of an assumed constitutional freedom of the elector under the Constitution, Art. II, § 1, to vote as he may choose in the electoral college, it would not follow that the requirement of a pledge in the primary is unconstitutional.