Where did black voter turnout increase in 2008?

November 28, 2020 Off By idswater

Where did black voter turnout increase in 2008?

From 2004 to 2008, the greatest increases were in Southern states with large black eligible voter populations: Mississippi (where the voter turnout rate was up 8 percentage points), Georgia (7.5 points), North Carolina (6.1 points) and Louisiana (6.0 points). It also increased in the District of Columbia (6.9 points). 5

What was the percentage of Asian voters in 2008?

Among Asians, 338,000 more votes were reported cast in 2008 than in 2004. The number of white voters in 2008 was also up, but only slightly—increasing from 99.6 million in 2004 to 100 million in 2008. The Pew Research Center analysis of Census Bureau data also finds a distinct regional pattern in the state-by-state increases in turnout.

Why was the electorate so diverse in 2008?

The unprecedented diversity of the electorate last year was driven by increases both in the number and in the turnout rates of minority eligible voters. The levels of participation by black, Hispanic and Asian eligible voters all increased from 2004 to 2008, reducing the voter participation gap between themselves and white eligible voters.

What was the percentage of young voters in 2008?

Voters ages 18-29 turned out at a higher rate in 2008 than in 2004 in several battleground states. Young voters increased their share of the total electorate by five points in Indiana]

From 2004 to 2008, the greatest increases were in Southern states with large black eligible voter populations: Mississippi (where the voter turnout rate was up 8 percentage points), Georgia (7.5 points), North Carolina (6.1 points) and Louisiana (6.0 points). It also increased in the District of Columbia (6.9 points). 5

Voters ages 18-29 turned out at a higher rate in 2008 than in 2004 in several battleground states. Young voters increased their share of the total electorate by five points in Indiana]

Among Asians, 338,000 more votes were reported cast in 2008 than in 2004. The number of white voters in 2008 was also up, but only slightly—increasing from 99.6 million in 2004 to 100 million in 2008. The Pew Research Center analysis of Census Bureau data also finds a distinct regional pattern in the state-by-state increases in turnout.

The unprecedented diversity of the electorate last year was driven by increases both in the number and in the turnout rates of minority eligible voters. The levels of participation by black, Hispanic and Asian eligible voters all increased from 2004 to 2008, reducing the voter participation gap between themselves and white eligible voters.