Why did the constitutional convention create the Electoral College?

November 22, 2020 Off By idswater

Why did the constitutional convention create the Electoral College?

The Electoral College was created by the framers of the U.S. Constitution as an alternative to electing the president by popular vote or by Congress. Several weeks after the general election, electors from each state meet in their state capitals and cast their official vote for president and vice president.

When was the Electoral College put in place?

The Electoral College was devised at the Constitutional Convention in 1787. It was a compromise between those who wanted direct popular elections for president and those who preferred to have Congress decide.

How is the Electoral College disenfranchises the people?

The Electoral College is responsible for disenfranchising, in effect, huge swaths of American voters, said Doug McAdam, a professor of sociology who studies American politics. A single national popular or “constituency” vote would determine the president based on who won the most votes total across the country.

What was the outcome of the Constitutional Convention?

In the end, the Convention selected members of the BrearlyCommittee whose objective was to settle outstanding issues. The chief of these was the Presidential clause. On September 4, the BrearlyCommittee recommended that the Convention support the Electoral College method of choosing a president.

What was the major theme of the Constitutional Convention?

The chief of these was the Presidential clause. On September 4, the BrearlyCommittee recommended that the Convention support the Electoral College method of choosing a president. On September 6and 7, the delegates agreed to a four-year renewable term for the President and that he be a natural born citizen.

Why was the Electoral College rejected at the Constitutional Convention?

The Constitutional Convention rejected this parliamentary model. The delegates wanted an independent executive and real separation of powers. Some suggested a direct election, but that too was rejected. The Electoral College was the result of a compromise, just like Congress and the Bill of Rights.

How is the Electoral College set up in the Constitution?

Fortunately, how the Electoral College functions is up to the states. Article 2, Section 1 of the Constitution says: “Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors…” The red and blue map we watch on election night is not set in stone; it’s set in state statutes.

The Electoral College is responsible for disenfranchising, in effect, huge swaths of American voters, said Doug McAdam, a professor of sociology who studies American politics. A single national popular or “constituency” vote would determine the president based on who won the most votes total across the country.

Why is the Electoral College important to the United States?

In a time of political turbulence, the United States needs the Electoral College more than ever. Trent England is the founder and director of Save Our States and the David and Ann Brown Distinguished Fellow at the Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs. The Founding Fathers thought it was the best way to choose the president.