What should the air pressure be on a basketball?

November 8, 2020 Off By idswater

What should the air pressure be on a basketball?

Loading… For a 29.5″ basketball (mens) and a 28.5″ basketball (womens), the recommended air pressure range is 7 – 9 PSI. The irony is almost no one has a gauge to accurately check the PSI rating on a basketball while inflating it because most pumps aren’t equipped with a gauge and ones that are rarely give an accurate reading.

How tall do you Drop a basketball inflated to 8 psi?

Drop a basketball inflated to 8 psi from a height of 6 feet (1.8 meters). Be sure that the bottom of the ball-not the top-is at the 6-feet line when you drop it. Observe, mark, and measure the height of the ball’s bounce, remembering to measure at the top of the ball.

How does air affect the shape of a basketball?

As the molecules move about, they come in contact with surfaces of objects. The molecules push and press on those surfaces, exerting pressure on them. It’s that pressure that allows your basketball to keep its round shape and remain hard and bouncy. If air escapes from the ball, the pressure inside the ball changes.

Why does a basketball have to bounce so much?

The force that pushes air against every solid surface it comes in contact with is the air pressure. In simpler terms, the more air in an enclosed area, the higher the air pressure. If this theory is correct, that means you need an optimum amount of air in your basketball to get the best bouncing result on the court.

What is the air pressure of a basketball?

A regulation basketball used in NBA play is inflated to an air pressure between 7.5 and 8.5 pounds of pressure per square inch. Many balls are inflated to the average pressure of 8 pounds. Regulating a basketball’s air pressure ensures fair playing conditions throughout a league.

How can you tell the PSI of a basketball?

The irony is almost no one has a gauge to accurately check the PSI rating on a basketball while inflating it because most pumps aren’t equipped with a gauge and ones that are rarely give an accurate reading. So the trick commonly used by basketball referees and coaches is to hold the ball up to face level and let it drop by free fall.

Drop a basketball inflated to 8 psi from a height of 6 feet (1.8 meters). Be sure that the bottom of the ball-not the top-is at the 6-feet line when you drop it. Observe, mark, and measure the height of the ball’s bounce, remembering to measure at the top of the ball.

As the molecules move about, they come in contact with surfaces of objects. The molecules push and press on those surfaces, exerting pressure on them. It’s that pressure that allows your basketball to keep its round shape and remain hard and bouncy. If air escapes from the ball, the pressure inside the ball changes.