What is the purpose of Kumina?

July 20, 2020 Off By idswater

What is the purpose of Kumina?

The practices of Kumina are primarily linked to healing. Healing ceremonies utilise singing, dancing, drumming, animal sacrifice, and spirit possession, with the intent of summoning spirits to heal the sick individual. These elements are also found in Myalism and Zion Revivalism.

What is Kumina dance?

Kumina, also spelt Cumina, is a dance-music ritual centred on communication with the ancestors. It is said to have originated in the Congo region of West Africa and as such has the greatest African retention of all the Jamaican folk dances.

How is Kumina performed?

It is generally performed in the parish of St. Thomas to celebrate special events such as engagements and weddings. The three most important elements in a Kumina session are dancing, singing and drumming. The drums are believed to be the most important because of the control they have over the spirits.

What are the characteristics of Kumina dance?

One of the distinct features of Kumina is the prominence of dance and ritual as a form of religious and cultural expression. Dance and rituals are used to invoke communication with the ancestral spirits. The rituals involve singing, dancing, music and sacrificial offerings.

What are the instruments used in kumina?

Chief instruments used in Kumina include the kbandu, a drum wrapped with the skin of a male goat, and the cast, or lead drum, wrapped in the skin of a female goat. The distinction is important, as the skins give the drums their distinctive sound, which are important in the ceremonies.

What is the traditional dance of Jamaica?

Bruckins, burru, dinki-minni, ettu, gerreh, gumbay, jonkunnu, kumina, maypole, myal, quadrille, tambu and zella. Dance is such a wonderful artistic expression, influenced by history and culture. Jamaica has a rich heritage of traditional dances, but today many of them are hardly known.

What is Jamaican dance called?

Daggering is a form of dance originating from Jamaica. Daggering is not a traditional dance; it is of recent origin, associated with the 2006 wave of dancehall music.

What is Jamaican mento music?

Mento is a style of Jamaican folk music recognisable by its acoustic sounds. It became a feature of Caribbean music in the 1920s, but the golden years of this genre, were in the 1940s and 50s. Mento is a fusion of African and European rhythms and musical traditions reflecting many centuries of history.

What dances are European?

To get your toes tapping, here are some traditional dances you can expect to see when visiting these European destinations.

  • Spain – Flamenco.
  • Greece – Greek dancing.
  • France – Can-can.
  • Italy – Tarantella.
  • Turkey – Belly dancing.
  • Germany – Polka.

Which drum is used in kumina?

kbandu
African elements Chief instruments used in Kumina include the kbandu, a drum wrapped with the skin of a male goat, and the cast, or lead drum, wrapped in the skin of a female goat. The distinction is important, as the skins give the drums their distinctive sound, which are important in the ceremonies.

What is the element of the Kumina ceremony?

His element is thunder. Kumina ceremonies take the form of dancing in a counterclockwise circle around drummers seated on two drums: the bandu or kibandu, and the playin’ kyas (cask).

What kind of religion is Kumina in Jamaica?

KUMINA IN JAMAICA. Kumina is described as one of the most African religious expressions in Jamaica. Standing the test of time, Kumina has managed to survive the influences of Western culture.

How does Kumina dance in a circular pattern?

The dancers move in a circular pattern around the musicians and centre pole, either singly or with a partner. The arms, shoulders, rib cage, and hips are employed, offering the dancers ample opportunity for variations and interpretation of the counter-beats or poly-rhythms.

How many movements are in a ceremony of Carols?

1 The form (organizational structure) of A Ceremony of Carols is a multi-sectioned cycle of 11 movements. (Some authorities describe the work in 12 movements and separately number the pieces “That yongë child” and “Balulalow”).