Who was president in 1840s?

July 17, 2020 Off By idswater

Who was president in 1840s?

John Tyler became the tenth President of the United States (1841-1845) when President William Henry Harrison died in April 1841.

Who were the 3 candidates in the election of 1848?

Results

Presidential candidate Party Home state
Zachary Taylor Whig Louisiana
Lewis Cass Democratic Michigan
Martin Van Buren Free Soil New York

Who was the Whig candidate for vice president in 1840?

In 1840 the Democratic national convention took the unprecedented course of refusing to nominate anyone for the vice presidency. In the ensuing election, Van Buren and Johnson were defeated by the Whig candidates William Henry Harrison and John Tyler.

What was the campaign like for president in 1840?

The campaign of 1840 was heavy on image-making, less so on substance—a harbinger of things to come. One Democratic wag observed that Harrison would probably be just as happy with a jug of hard cider to sip in front of his log cabin as serving as president.

How many electoral votes did Harrison win in 1840?

With Van Buren weakened by economic woes, Harrison won a popular majority and 234 of 294 electoral votes. Voter participation surged as white male suffrage became nearly universal, and a contemporary record of 42.4% of the voting age population voted for Harrison.

Who was the Whig nominee for president in 1839?

In 1839, the Whigs held a national convention for the first time. The 1839 Whig National Convention saw 1836 nominee William Henry Harrison defeat former Secretary of State Henry Clay and General Winfield Scott.

Who was the Whig candidate for president in 1840?

The party nominated the popular retired general William Henry Harrison of Ohio for President, the most successful of the three Whig presidential candidates from the previous election. Harrison won a close victory on the convention’s fifth ballot against party founder Henry Clay and General Winfield Scott.

Who was the Vice President of the United States in 1840?

The delegates unanimously voted to nominate William Henry Harrison for president (who the party had supported for president the previous election along with Francis Granger for Vice President) and Daniel Webster for Vice President.

The campaign of 1840 was heavy on image-making, less so on substance—a harbinger of things to come. One Democratic wag observed that Harrison would probably be just as happy with a jug of hard cider to sip in front of his log cabin as serving as president.

With Van Buren weakened by economic woes, Harrison won a popular majority and 234 of 294 electoral votes. Voter participation surged as white male suffrage became nearly universal, and a contemporary record of 42.4% of the voting age population voted for Harrison.