Why did George Washington read the crisis at Valley Forge?

July 15, 2020 Off By idswater

Why did George Washington read the crisis at Valley Forge?

Hoping to inspire soldiers and save his own job, Washington ordered all his officers to read Thomas Paine’s “The American Crisis” to their troops. Washington decided to encamp that winter at Valley Forge close to the continental capital Philadelphia, which had fallen into British hands.

Why did George Washington want the crisis to be read to his soldiers?

By reading American Crisis to his army, Washington probably hoped to convince soldiers they were fighting for a worthwhile “cause.” If he could inspire their beliefs even for one night, his chances of success would increase greatly. Washington also probably understood that he was fighting a very different kind of war.

Why did Thomas Paine not like George Washington?

In 1796 Paine published a bitter open letter to George Washington, personally attacking Washington as an incompetent general and elitist president who had betrayed Paine for not protecting him when he claimed American citizenship when arrested by France.

Why was Valley Forge important to the Continental Army?

Valley Forge is the location of the 1777-1778 winter encampment of the Continental Army under General George Washington. Here the Continental Army, a collection of disparate colonial militias, emerged under Washington’s leadership as a cohesive and disciplined fighting force.

When did Washington lead his troops out of Valley Forge?

Once Washington’s detractors in Congress realized they could not sway his troops’ loyalty, they gave up on any secret plans to replace him. In March 1778, Washington led his troops, their bodies and supplies replenished and their confidence restored, out of Valley Forge to face the British again.

When was the winter of 1777 at Valley Forge?

Military and naval history expert Kennedy Hickman has nearly 20 years of experience as a museum curator and director, and has been featured on The History Channel. The encampment at Valley Forge took place from December 19, 1777 through June 19, 1778 and served as winter quarters for General George Washington’s Continental Army.

How big was the encampment at Valley Forge?

The suffering of the soldiers at Valley Forge, and Washington’s desperate attempts to rally Congress and the states to their aid, has become legend. This was the first large, prolonged winter encampment that the Continental Army endured—nine thousand men were quartered at Valley Forge for a six-month period.

Valley Forge is the location of the 1777-1778 winter encampment of the Continental Army under General George Washington. Here the Continental Army, a collection of disparate colonial militias, emerged under Washington’s leadership as a cohesive and disciplined fighting force.

Once Washington’s detractors in Congress realized they could not sway his troops’ loyalty, they gave up on any secret plans to replace him. In March 1778, Washington led his troops, their bodies and supplies replenished and their confidence restored, out of Valley Forge to face the British again.

How long was the encampment at Valley Forge?

However, in spite of these advantages, Washington’s army was ill-prepared for the encampment that would last six months.

What was the winter like at Valley Forge?

Winter at Valley Forge. The army’s supply of basic necessities, like food and clothing, ran perpetually short; coupled with the wintertime cold, and the diseases that ran rampant through the camp, this lack of provisions created the infamously miserable conditions at Valley Forge.