What is the standard size of a parking space?

July 10, 2020 Off By idswater

What is the standard size of a parking space?

The minimum size of a standard parking space shall be nine feet wide and eighteen feet long. Parking spaces within enclosed garages shall have an interior dimension of at least ten feet wide and twenty feet long. The minimum size of a compact parking space shall be eight feet wide and sixteen feet long. B.

How do I calculate my parking lot size?

You calculate it by dividing the building’s number of spaces by its total square footage in thousands of feet. For instance, take a 40,000 square foot building with a 200 space parking lot. Divide 200 (spaces) by 40 (thousand square feet) to find a parking ratio of 5 spaces per 1,000 square feet of space.

What is the distance between parking spaces?

In North America, the standard parking space dimensions range between 8.5 to 9 feet wide by 18 feet long. Parking lot aisles will have a space between rows ranging between 14 to 24 feet, depending on whether they’re a one-way or a two-way aisle.

What is a good parking ratio?

While the most common office building parking ratio is currently around 4 (spots per 1,000 sq. ft.), many tenants have been asking for ratios of 5 or 6.

How do you maximize parking spaces?

Basic best practices are to:

  1. Eliminate dead-end parking areas, so there’s always a flow-through of traffic along aisles (the driving lanes facilitating access to parking spots)
  2. Locate aisles and rows of parking parallel to the long dimension of the site.
  3. Orient parking on each side of an aisle.

How many parking spaces is 1000 square feet?

In the end, your parking ratio is 2, or two parking spaces per every one thousand square feet. If you find that you need to provide more parking spaces for your commercial building, consider using a semi-automated parking system to bolster your existing parking garage.

Does angled parking save space?

Angled parking lots provide an appealing alternative to 90 degree straight lots. Common parking angles are 45 degrees and 60 degrees, which may actually save space. According to David Percy, a professor of mathematics at the University of Salford, these angled parking lots are a better use of space than straight lots.