How many Kansans voted in the 2016 election?

July 1, 2020 Off By idswater

How many Kansans voted in the 2016 election?

2016 United States presidential election in Kansas

Party Republican Democratic
Home state New York New York
Running mate Mike Pence Tim Kaine
Electoral vote 6 0
Popular vote 671,018 427,005

How many Marylanders voted in 2016?

2016 United States presidential election in Maryland

Party Democratic Republican
Home state New York New York
Running mate Tim Kaine Mike Pence
Electoral vote 10 0
Popular vote 1,677,928 943,169

Is Johnson County red or blue?

In the past, Johnson County has been solidly Republican. From 1916 to 2016, it voted Republican in every presidential election.

How did Missouri vote in 2016 presidential election?

Missouri has 10 electoral votes in the Electoral College. Trump carried the state with 56.4% of the vote, while Clinton received 37.9%. Trump’s 18.5-point margin of victory in the state was almost double that of Mitt Romney’s from 2012.

Where is Johnson County?

Johnson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 150,934. Its county seat is Cleburne. Johnson County is named for Middleton Johnson, a Texas Ranger, soldier, and politician….Johnson County, Texas.

Johnson County
Seat Cleburne
Largest city Burleson
Area
• Total 734 sq mi (1,900 km2)

What region is Johnson County in Iowa?

Johnson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Iowa. As of the 2010 census, the population was 130,882 making it the fifth-most populous county in Iowa….

Johnson County, Iowa
County Courthouse
Largest city Iowa City
Area – Total – Land – Water 623 sq mi (1,614 km²) 614 sq mi (1,590 km²) 9.1 sq mi (24 km²), 1.5%

Who did Missouri vote for in the 2016 presidential election?

Missouri has 10 electoral votes in the Electoral College. Trump carried the state with 56.4% of the vote, while Clinton received 37.9%.

How many more people voted in 2016 than in 2012?

Overall, in 2016, there were about 4.6 million more reported voters than in 2012. A majority of these additional voters (3.7 million) were 65 years and older. Remember, despite these additional reported voters, the overall voting rate was not statistically different between the two elections.

Who are the voters in the United States in 2016?

When analyzed alongside race and Hispanic origin, in 2016 a large portion of the additional reported voters (2.8 million) were non-Hispanic whites who were also 65 years of age and older. In addition to race, Hispanic origin and age, reported voting rates varied according to a variety of other social, demographic and economic factors as well.

What was the population of the United States in 2016?

Table 1 shows changes in both the number of reported voters and the citizen voting-age population between 2012 and 2016. Overall, in 2016, there were about 4.6 million more reported voters than in 2012. A majority of these additional voters (3.7 million) were 65 years and older.

What was the percentage of black voters in 2016?

Additionally, 2016 was only the second election in this series where the share of non-Hispanic black voters decreased, from 12.9 percent in 2012 to 11.9 percent in 2016. 3 Voting rates have also historically varied according to age, with older Americans generally voting at higher rates than younger Americans (Figure 4).

Overall, in 2016, there were about 4.6 million more reported voters than in 2012. A majority of these additional voters (3.7 million) were 65 years and older. Remember, despite these additional reported voters, the overall voting rate was not statistically different between the two elections.

When analyzed alongside race and Hispanic origin, in 2016 a large portion of the additional reported voters (2.8 million) were non-Hispanic whites who were also 65 years of age and older. In addition to race, Hispanic origin and age, reported voting rates varied according to a variety of other social, demographic and economic factors as well.

What was the voter turnout rate in 2016?

Voter turnout in 2016 was about 60 percent, the second-highest rate in the last half-century, according to USA Today. More people voted in the Senate races than voted for president four years ago, according to Business Insider.

Additionally, 2016 was only the second election in this series where the share of non-Hispanic black voters decreased, from 12.9 percent in 2012 to 11.9 percent in 2016. 3 Voting rates have also historically varied according to age, with older Americans generally voting at higher rates than younger Americans (Figure 4).