What was the reason for the Second Opium War?

June 10, 2020 Off By idswater

What was the reason for the Second Opium War?

The second Opium War was initiated due to a number of factors that are outlined below: The Treaty of Nanking was signed by China and the United Kingdom at the end of the first Opium War. However, the Chinese refused to adhere to the terms stipulated in the treaty.

Who was involved in the Opium Wars in China?

The Opium Wars, also known as the Anglo-Chinese Wars, were two separate conflicts that occurred between the Qing Dynasty in China and the British Empire.

Why did the British attack Hong Kong in the Opium War?

Attempts by the Chinese rulers to ban the importation of opium, which became a major public health problem, led the British to attack Hong Kong, which initiated the war. The final Chinese defeat caused the latter to accept trade agreements that were negative for their interests and to admit that opium continued to fill its streets.

When did the Opium Wars start and end?

The Opium Wars, also known as the Anglo-Chinese Wars, were two separate conflicts that occurred between the Qing Dynasty in China and the British Empire. Both wars were the climax of disputes and tensions over trade and diplomatic relations between the two powers. The first of the Opium Wars occurred from 1839 to 1842,…

What happened during the Second Opium War?

The second Opium War was the result of the desire of Great Britain and France to win additional commercial privileges in China, including the legalization of the opium trade, as well as to gain more legal and territorial concessions in China.

What years were Opium Wars?

The Opium Wars were two wars between China and Western countries during the Qing dynasty. The first was between Great Britain and China and lasted from 1839 until 1842.

What was the British Opium War?

The First Opium War was fought from March 18, 1839, to August 29, 1842, and was also known as the First Anglo-Chinese War. 69 British troops and approximately 18,000 Chinese soldiers perished. As a result of the war, Britain won trade rights, access to five treaty ports, and Hong Kong.