Why did the framers of the Constitution make it possible to amend the Constitution?

May 16, 2020 Off By idswater

Why did the framers of the Constitution make it possible to amend the Constitution?

The possibility of amending the Constitution helped ensure its ratification, although many feared the powerful federal government it created would deprive them of their rights. To allay their anxieties, the framers promised that a Bill of Rights safeguarding individual liberties would be added following ratification.

Who could amend the Constitution?

The Constitution provides that an amendment may be proposed either by the Congress with a two-thirds majority vote in both the House of Representatives and the Senate or by a constitutional convention called for by two-thirds of the State legislatures.

Why is it so difficult to amend the US Constitution?

The founders made the amendment process difficult because they wanted to lock in the political deals that made ratification of the Constitution possible. Moreover, they recognized that, for a government to function well, the ground rules should be stable. From 1870 to today, only 12 amendments have been enacted.

Which method to formally amend the US Constitution has been used only once?

Authority to Amend the U.S. Constitution Amendments proposed by Congress or convention become valid only when ratified by the legislatures of, or conventions in, three-fourths of the states (i.e., 38 of 50 states).

Why did the framers want to amend the Constitution?

The Founding Fathers realized that society would continue to change. They wanted to make it possible, although difficult, to amend the Constitution if needed to adjust to these changes. Why did the framers make the constitution difficult to attend?

Can a state make an amendment to the Constitution?

Yes. The Constitution includes the ability to make Amendments. They can be initiated by the states or by the Congress. Amendments require two thirds of the states to ratify it to make it law. Why did the farmers make it hard to change the constitution?

Why was it so difficult to amend the Constitution?

The Framers wanted it to be relatively easy to consider changes to the Constitution. Yet they wanted proposed changes to be carefully considered.They also wanted to be sure that Amendments had the full support of the nation.Therefore, it is more difficult to ratify an Amendment and make it into law than it is to propose, or suggest, it.

Why did the founding fathers not want to amend the Constitution?

The reason this didn’t work was that, 50 years later, the slavery dispute was getting nasty. People knew that the slaveowners would try to write a Constitution that would suit their greed and that abolitions would have to fight them tooth and nail. So they left the constitution as it was, even with an awkward amendment process.

The Founding Fathers realized that society would continue to change. They wanted to make it possible, although difficult, to amend the Constitution if needed to adjust to these changes. Why did the framers make the constitution difficult to attend?

Yes. The Constitution includes the ability to make Amendments. They can be initiated by the states or by the Congress. Amendments require two thirds of the states to ratify it to make it law. Why did the farmers make it hard to change the constitution?

Why was there no attempt to amend the Constitution?

I appreciate even more deeply now the obstacles the framers of the Constitution put in the way of the amendment process. The reason is simple: even though my efforts were unsuccessful, and there is no E.R.A. in the Constitution, there is also no official school prayer amendment or anti-abortion amendment.

How are the 27 amendments to the constitution passed?

Congress has proposed all 27 amendments to the Constitution of the United States. 26 of these amendments were passed by three-fourths of state legislatures and one amendment was passed by three-fourths of state conventions. In the state convention method, two-thirds of states ask Congress to organize a convention.