What literary devices did Lincoln use in the Gettysburg Address?

April 29, 2020 Off By idswater

What literary devices did Lincoln use in the Gettysburg Address?

“The Gettysburg Address” by Abraham Lincoln is remarkable through the use of rhetorical devices like allusion, antithesis, and tricolon.

Why does Lincoln use anaphora in the Gettysburg Address?

Lincoln frequently uses anaphora, the repetition of a word or words at the beginning of successive phrases or clauses. This figure of speech helps to balance the structure of the sentences while imparting force and emphasis.

When did Abraham Lincoln give the Gettysburg Address speech?

November 19, 1863
Lincoln delivered one of the most famous speeches in United States history at the dedication of the Gettysburg National Cemetery on November 19, 1863.

What are two examples of parallelism in the Gettysburg Address?

Some powerful examples of parallelism include the following:

  • a new nation, that nation, any nation.
  • that nation, that war, that field, that nation.
  • we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate, we cannot hallow.
  • shall not have died in vain, shall have a new birth, shall not parish from the earth.

What is a metaphor in the Gettysburg Address?

Birth, death, rebirth and immortality (“shall not perish”) — in a place that we will make sacred (“hallow” and “consecrate” and the key repeated word, “dedicate”) — is a stunning extended metaphor that turns into an biblical allusion of hope for transcendence even during the worst suffering, with the Battle of …

Why does Lincoln repeat the people?

Lincoln uses repetition in the speech to add emphasis to his point and create an emphatic tone. The word “nation” is repeated to deepen his point about reunification. And he uses the word to call for continued dedication to finish the war so that the dead will not have died in vain.

How did Abraham Lincoln honor the dead at Gettysburg?

Lincoln’s Arrival Wills helped arrange the cemetery and its dedication on November 19, 1863, on land purchased by Pennsylvania to honor the Union dead. Although President Lincoln spent only 24 hours in Gettysburg, he, too, changed the town’s history.

How did Abraham Lincoln use parallelism in the Gettysburg Address?

As well as the more direct examples of parallelism, implied parallelism is used when Lincoln says “The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here…” Had Lincoln used direct parallelism here, he would’ve said “The world will little note what we say here, nor long remember what we say here,” but he uses …

What is the main purpose of the Gettysburg Address?

Lincoln’s main purpose was to urge everyone to honor those who had died at Gettysburg by striving to maintain the kind of nation imagined by America’s founders. President Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address on November 19, 1863.

What literary device is Abraham Lincoln using when he uses the phrase Four score and seven years ago as the opening lines of the Gettysburg Address?

The speech’s opening words are an allusion. “Four score and seven years ago” works out to eighty-seven years, and since Lincoln gave the speech in 1863, he is alluding to the year of the founding of the US, 1776.

What does the tricolon mean in the Gettysburg Address?

The tricolon is meant to add power to words and make them memorable. One example is: “But in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate, we cannot hallow, this ground.” (ll. 10-11). This tricolon emphasizes t…

What was the length of Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address?

The short length of President Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg address was unusual for the time. It was preceded by a two-hour long speech. Despite this, Lincoln’s speech has had an impact that has lasted to this day. Photograph from the U.S. Library of Congress

What are the devices used in the Gettysburg Address?

Which is the first draft of the Gettysburg Address?

Beginning in the 1870s, historians argued over which copy was the original draft. Most now agree that the document known as the “Nicolay copy” was the earliest draft, which Lincoln began at the White House, revised in Gettysburg, and carried in his hand while he spoke.

How are tricolons used in the Gettysburg Address?

Tricolons in the Gettysburg Address. The third part in a tricolon used in oratory is usually more emphatic and conclusive than the others. This is the chief device used in Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, and is doubled at its conclusion: ‘But, in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate, we cannot hallow,…

What are two rhetorical devices Lincoln used in his Gettysburg Address?

Abraham Lincoln was able to pack many effective uses of rhetorical devices into his short address at Gettysburg. The speech’s opening words are an allusion. “Four score and seven years ago” works out to eighty-seven years, and since Lincoln gave the speech in 1863, he is alluding to the year of the founding of the US, 1776.

How did Lincoln use tricolon in his speech?

And lastly, Lincoln used tricolon, three parallel verbs in succession, with “dedicate, consecrate, and hallow” to pay tribute to the men whose final resting place will be the battlefield where nearly 3,200 men died. Lincoln begins his famous speech by using archaic language.

What did Lincoln say at the end of the Gettysburg Address?

—Abraham Lincoln, Gettysburg Address R Epistrophe Using the same word or words to end a series of lines, phrases, clauses, or sentences Ex: “With this faith we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day.”