How are the truth conditions of a sentence related?

April 12, 2020 Off By idswater

How are the truth conditions of a sentence related?

The part of the sentence on the right of the “if and only if” specifies the condition of the world that must obtain for the sentence named by the quote to be true. This also holds for us: the truth condition of a sentence depends on the truth conditions of its parts. It is for this reason that we can use truth tables.

Which is the truth condition of the sentence swill?

Thus, the truth condition of a given sentence Swill consist in a relation between the things in the world that correspond to the parts of S. This is often expressed in the following way: “Snow is white” is true if and only if (or just in case) snow is white.

Is the coherence theory of truth subject to criticism?

This argument, like Blanshard’s, depends on a coherence theory of justification. The argument infers from such a theory that we can only know that a proposition coheres with a set of beliefs. We can never know that a proposition corresponds to reality. This argument is subject to at least two criticisms.

How is the correspondence theory different from the truth theory?

The correspondence theory, in contrast, states that the truth conditions of propositions are not (in general) propositions, but rather objective features of the world. (Even the correspondence theorist holds that propositions about propositions have propositions as their truth conditions.)

What are the truth conditions of a sentence?

Truth conditions of a sentence don’t necessarily reflect current reality. They are merely the conditions under which the statement would be true. More formally, a truth condition makes for the truth of a sentence in an inductive definition of truth (for details, see the semantic theory of truth ).

Which is more controversial, the truth or the belief condition?

The belief condition is only slightly more controversial than the truth condition. The general idea behind the belief condition is that you can only know what you believe. Failing to believe something precludes knowing it. “Belief” in the context of the JTB theory means full belief, or outright belief.

The correspondence theory, in contrast, states that the truth conditions of propositions are not (in general) propositions, but rather objective features of the world. (Even the correspondence theorist holds that propositions about propositions have propositions as their truth conditions.)

This argument, like Blanshard’s, depends on a coherence theory of justification. The argument infers from such a theory that we can only know that a proposition coheres with a set of beliefs. We can never know that a proposition corresponds to reality. This argument is subject to at least two criticisms.