Can a compound have more than 8 valence electrons?

April 1, 2020 Off By idswater

Can a compound have more than 8 valence electrons?

Yes. While having an octet of valence electrons creates an exceptionally deep energy minimum for most atoms, it is only a minimum, not a fundamental requirement. If there are sufficiently strong compensating energy factors, even atoms that strongly prefer octets can form stable compounds with more (or less) than the 8 valence shell electrons.

How to find the valence electrons of an element?

We have shown the Valence Electrons of the elements for which reliable data is available. Mouseover on the chart to see the element name and Valence Electrons of the element. This Valence Electrons chart table gives the Valence Electrons of all the elements of periodic table .

Why are atoms with 8 valence electrons so stable?

Eight electrons in this final shell allow atoms to be stable and non-reactive. Noble gases, for example, are some of the most non-reactive chemical elements one can find in nature. They compose the far-right section of the periodic table and are known as noble gases because they are so self-sufficient!

How many valence electrons does Fe ( 26 ) have?

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How many valence electrons does Group 8 have?

How many valence electrons does group 8 have? Keeping this in consideration, how many valence electrons are in each group?

How many valence electrons does an element have?

Following this rule: Elements in group 1 have one valence electron; elements in group 2 have two valence electrons; elements in group 13 have three valence electrons; elements in group 14 have four valence electrons; and so forth up to group 18.

Why does neon have 8 valence electrons in its outer shell?

The goal for atoms is to gain 8 electrons in the outer shell (valence electrons) and therefore neon is “happy” (does not need to lose or gain any). Neon is inert (non-reactive), part of the Noble Gas family (they don’t “mix” or “associate” with the “lesser” elements which do not have full outer shells).

Why are electrons in the outermost shell called valence electrons?

Electrons in the outermost shell are called valence electrons, because it is their interactions that determine the chemical properties of an element. The columns that were set up to group elements by similar chemical properties turn out to be the exact same columns defined by the number of valence electrons.