What was the National Commission on marijuana and Drug Abuse 1972 report?

February 16, 2020 Off By idswater

What was the National Commission on marijuana and Drug Abuse 1972 report?

The Commission extensively utilized data from this survey, along with information from the medical literature on marijuana, in their 1972 report, Marihuana: A Signal of Misunderstanding. One of the report’s findings was that only 37% of adult respondents thought marijuana use was a problem best handled using a legal approach.

When was marijuana decriminalized in the United States?

Decriminalization is a policy that was first defined by the 1972 Shaffer Commission (also known as the National Commission on Marihuana and Drug Abuse), and it describes policies that do not define possession for personal use or casual (nonmonetary) distribution as a criminal offense.

What was the public opinion on marijuana in 1971?

The Public Attitudes Toward Marihuana survey was carried out in 1971 and included a sample of 2,611 adults who were asked about their beliefs regarding marijuana, their views on marijuana legislation, their impressions of marijuana users, and their personal experience with the drug.

How does marijuana use lead to problem use?

Marijuana use can lead to the development of problem use, known as a marijuana use disorder, which takes the form of addiction in severe cases. Marijuana use disorders are often associated with dependence—in which a person feels withdrawal symptoms when not taking the drug.

What did the National Commission on marijuana and drug abuse say?

Forty years ago on March 22, 1973, the National Commission on Marijuana and Drug Abuse* said in its final report: “A coherent social policy requires a fundamental alteration of social attitudes toward drug use, and a willingness to embark on new courses when previous actions have failed.”

Decriminalization is a policy that was first defined by the 1972 Shaffer Commission (also known as the National Commission on Marihuana and Drug Abuse), and it describes policies that do not define possession for personal use or casual (nonmonetary) distribution as a criminal offense.

What did the Shafer Commission say about marijuana?

The Commission’s report said that while public sentiment tended to view marijuana users as dangerous, they actually found users to be more timid, drowsy and passive. It concluded that cannabis did not cause widespread danger to society. It recommended using social measures other than criminalization to discourage use.

Who was the chairman of the Marijuana Control Commission?

On March 22, 1972, the Commission’s chairman, Raymond P. Shafer, presented a report to Congress and the public entitled “Marihuana, A Signal of Misunderstanding,” which favored ending marijuana prohibition and adopting other methods to discourage use.