Which is the best slogan for a president?

January 30, 2020 Off By idswater

Which is the best slogan for a president?

1 “He’s making us proud again” – Gerald Ford 2 “Not Just Peanuts” – Jimmy Carter 3 “A Leader, for a Change” (also “Leaders, for a Change”) – Jimmy Carter 4 “Why not the Best?” – Jimmy Carter 5 “Peaches And Cream” – Jimmy Carter (from Georgia) and running mate Walter Mondale (from Minnesota)

What did the slogan gone to the White House mean?

The slogan referred to the allegation that Cleveland had fathered an illegitimate child. When Cleveland was elected, his supporters added “Gone to the White House, Ha, Ha, Ha!” “Burn this letter!”

What was President Hoover’s campaign slogan in 1932?

“We are turning the corner” – 1932 campaign slogan in the depths of the Great Depression by Republican president Herbert Hoover. “Remember Hoover!” – 1936 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Franklin D. Roosevelt “I Want Roosevelt Again!” – Franklin D. Roosevelt

What’s the best way to write a marketing slogan?

Short & Simple — Most of the slogans above are under 10 words. Phone numbers are 7-10 digits so they can easily be remembered. Your slogan should be as well. Timeless — Ideas that hit on a moment in time are part of a marketing campaign, not your tagline. Be mindful of referencing current trends or technology in your tagline.

1 “He’s making us proud again” – Gerald Ford 2 “Not Just Peanuts” – Jimmy Carter 3 “A Leader, for a Change” (also “Leaders, for a Change”) – Jimmy Carter 4 “Why not the Best?” – Jimmy Carter 5 “Peaches And Cream” – Jimmy Carter (from Georgia) and running mate Walter Mondale (from Minnesota)

What was the slogan of the Carter campaign?

“A Leader, for a Change,” promised Carter, pitching himself as a reformer, untainted by scandal. Ronald Reagan, the 40th president of the United States, shown with his campaign slogan.

“We are turning the corner” – 1932 campaign slogan in the depths of the Great Depression by Republican president Herbert Hoover. “Remember Hoover!” – 1936 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Franklin D. Roosevelt “I Want Roosevelt Again!” – Franklin D. Roosevelt

The slogan referred to the allegation that Cleveland had fathered an illegitimate child. When Cleveland was elected, his supporters added “Gone to the White House, Ha, Ha, Ha!” “Burn this letter!”

Who was the first president to use the slogan we shall pierce you in 52?

“We Polked you in ’44, We shall Pierce you in ’52” – 1852 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Franklin Pierce; the ’44 referred to the 1844 election of James K. Polk as president. “The Hero of many battles.” – Winfield Scott “We’ll Buck ’em in ’56” – James Buchanan, playing on “Old Buck”, the nickname associated with his last name.

What was the slogan of the Cleveland campaign?

“Burn this letter!” – Cleveland supporters’ attack on Blaine’s supposed corruption, quoting a line from Blaine correspondence that became public. “Tell the Truth!” – Cleveland’s advice to his supporters after the allegations of his illegitimate child came to light. “Blaine, Blaine, James G. Blaine! The continental liar from the state of Maine!”

“Burn this letter!” – Cleveland supporters’ attack on Blaine’s supposed corruption, quoting a line from Blaine correspondence that became public. “Tell the Truth!” – Cleveland’s advice to his supporters after the allegations of his illegitimate child came to light. “Blaine, Blaine, James G. Blaine! The continental liar from the state of Maine!”

What was the slogan of the Blaine campaign?

“Ma, Ma, where’s my Pa?” – Used by James G. Blaine supporters against Grover Cleveland. The slogan referred to the allegation that Cleveland had fathered an illegitimate child. When Cleveland was elected, his supporters added “Gone to the White House, Ha, Ha, Ha!” “Burn this letter!”

Who was the first president to use the slogan the Union and the Constitution?

The Union and the Constitution” – John Bell (Also “John Bell and the Constitution”, and “The Union, the Constitution, and the enforcement of the laws.”) “For Union and Constitution” – Abraham Lincoln (Also “The Union and the Constitution”)