What can an adult do to stop bullying?

December 30, 2019 Off By idswater

What can an adult do to stop bullying?

Adults need to make it easy for kids to talk to them. Maintaining calm, expressing sympathy, thanking the child for having the strength to reach out, encouraging problem solving together, and following up later to make sure a proposed solution worked—those are all ways adults can support kids and nurture relationships that will help stop bullying.

How often do peers intervene to stop bullying?

Research suggests that peers are present during nine out of every 10 incidents of bullying—but intervene on behalf of victims less than 20 percent of the time. When peers do step in to stop bullying, however, the episode stops within 10 seconds more than half of the time.

Is there a safe place for victims of bullying?

There is no safe place for victims, because the online attack can happen without the victim being in the same place as the perpetrator. One of the most important things that adults can do to prevent bullying online is to maintain strong connections with kids offline.

How can we make a difference in bullying?

It is not complicated policies or grandiose programs that make the most difference, but rather consistent, daily, nurturing acts of reaching out to both children who bully and those who are are the receiving end of cruelty that bring about the most meaningful and lasting change.

Who is responsible to stop bullying in schools?

It is up to school administrators, educators and parents to work together to ensure that this is not the case. According to the HRSA (Health Resources & Services Administration), many schools have taken their responsibility to stop bullying very seriously and have put in place an anti-bullying system of rules and consequences. 1 

Adults need to make it easy for kids to talk to them. Maintaining calm, expressing sympathy, thanking the child for having the strength to reach out, encouraging problem solving together, and following up later to make sure a proposed solution worked—those are all ways adults can support kids and nurture relationships that will help stop bullying.

Research suggests that peers are present during nine out of every 10 incidents of bullying—but intervene on behalf of victims less than 20 percent of the time. When peers do step in to stop bullying, however, the episode stops within 10 seconds more than half of the time.

How should schools react to reports of bullying?

The administration should investigate a parent’s concerns and then inform the parents about their plans to remedy the situation. “School staff should never have a joint meeting with your child and the child who bullied them.”