What does Up Helly Aa celebrated?

October 30, 2019 Off By idswater

What does Up Helly Aa celebrated?

Up Helly Aa (meaning Up Holy Day) is a huge spectacle, a celebration of Shetland history, and a demonstration of islanders’ skills. BBC/Getty Images. The festival takes place in Shetland, off the north east coast of Scotland. It harks back to Shetland’s Viking heritage.

What is the origin of Up Helly Aa?

The festival’s roots date back to the early 1800s. Groups of young men in disguise would drag barrels of lighted tar on sledges through the streets of the islands’ capital, Lerwick. The young men refined their activities, resulting in the first Up Helly Aa torchlight procession in 1881.

What date is Up Helly Aa 2021?

25th January 2022
The health and safety of the community, participants and the many volunteers it takes to deliver the festival was the priority of Committee members when making the decision. The 2021 festival will now take place on Tuesday 25th January 2022.

When was Up Helly Aa last Cancelled?

The date of the next festival will be Tuesday, January 31 2023. This means the last event was January 28, 2020, before the pandemic. The event is rarely postponed or cancelled the last time — before the pandemic — was 1965 where it was postponed one week because of Winston Churchill’s death.

How long does Up Helly Aa last?

Lerwick Up Helly Aa is a superb spectacle, a celebration of Shetland history, and a triumphant demonstration of islanders’ skills and spirit. This northern Mardi Gras, run entirely by volunteers, lasts just one day (and all the following night). But it takes several thousand people 364 days to organise.

Can you fly to Shetland Islands?

Flying is the quickest way to get to Shetland and the view as you approach Sumburgh Airport – dramatic cliffs, rolling seas and tumbling hills – are an awe-inspiring introduction to the islands. There are several flights per day, to and from the major Scottish airports, and regular summer flights from Bergen.

What language is spoken in the Shetland Islands?

Shetlandic, or Shetland dialect, could be described as Old Scots (which is related to Middle English) with a strong Norse influence. It’s a waageng (aftertaste) of Norn, an extinct North Germanic language spoken in Shetland until the 18th century.

How many murders are there in Shetland?

In the first three seasons of Shetland, there have been a dozen or so murders and that number could soar to 15 by the end of the fourth series, giving the isles a murder rate of 68.2 per 100,000 people — and, if these killings were real, making it 11th on the world’s most deadly places list.

Do I need a passport to go to Shetland?

Passport. If you are visiting Shetland from the UK mainland, you don’t need a passport. If you are arriving from outwith the UK (for example, flying straight to Shetland from Norway) you will need one.

Where does the name Up Helly Aa come from?

Up Helly Aa. Up Helly Aa ( /ˈʌpˌhɛliə/ UP-hel-ee-ə; literally “Up Holy [Day] All”) refers to any of a variety of fire festivals held annually in the Shetland Islands of Scotland, in the middle of winter to mark the end of the yule season. The festival involves a procession of up to a thousand guizers in Lerwick…

How does the Up Helly Aa Festival work?

Up Helly Aa day involves a series of marches and visitations, culminating in a torch-lit procession and the burning of a galley. Up Helly Aa is a community event, with countless volunteers contributing many hours each winter towards organising and planning the following year’s festival.

When is Up Helly Aa Festival in Lerwick?

The 2021 festival will now take place on Tuesday 25th January 2022. Welcome to the official website for Up Helly Aa, which takes place in Lerwick, Shetland, on the last Tuesday in January every year. Up Helly Aa day involves a series of marches and visitations, culminating in a torch-lit procession and the burning of a galley.

What does Up Helly Aa mean in Shetland?

Up Helly Aa (meaning Up Holy Day) is a huge spectacle, a celebration of Shetland history, and a demonstration of islanders’ skills. It harks back to Shetland’s Viking heritage.