How many people voted in Lok Sabha in 2014?

October 7, 2019 Off By idswater

How many people voted in Lok Sabha in 2014?

The 2014 General Election, enacted in nine phases over a five-week period, witnessed 553.8 million voters cast ballots to constitute the 16th Lok Sabha. The resurgence of the Bharatiya Janata Party captured headlines and diverted attention from a disconcerting growth in gross electoral spending.

What was the total cost of Modi’s campaign?

The party spent Rs77.83 crore ($12.57 million) on chartering aircrafts for its star campaigners, of which Rs60 crore ($9.7 million) was paid to Saarthi Airways alone.

Who was the Prime Minister of India in 2014?

2014 Indian general election First party Second party Third party Leader Narendra Modi Rahul Gandhi J. Jayalalithaa Party BJP INC AIADMK Alliance NDA UPA Leader since 13 September 2013 N/A 1989

Why did the price of onions increase in India?

The price of onions, a staple in Indian cuisine, faced a dramatic increase. In the lead up to the election, consumer price inflation increased more than expected while, paradoxically, industrial production fell by more than expected, causing a dilemma amid slowing growth. The price of salt was also indicative of general food inflation.

The party spent Rs77.83 crore ($12.57 million) on chartering aircrafts for its star campaigners, of which Rs60 crore ($9.7 million) was paid to Saarthi Airways alone.

Are there limits on donations to political parties in India?

Beginning in 2017, the BJP made several changes to election contribution rules. A cap on corporate donations to political parties, which banned donations worth more than 7.5 percent of average net profit over three years, was removed. Companies with partial foreign ownership were allowed to donate.

How do Indian political parties get their money?

Here is an explanation of how Indian political parties get financing and how they spend the money: Individuals and corporations donate to Indian political parties, but lack of transparency makes it impossible to follow the money trail. Traditionally, parties have received funds in cash, cheques, and electoral trusts.