Why are pastoral societies able to produce surplus goods?

September 6, 2019 Off By idswater

Why are pastoral societies able to produce surplus goods?

Hence, pastoral societies are able to produce a surplus of goods, which makes storing food for future use a possibility. With storage comes the desire to develop settlements that permit the society to remain in a single place for longer periods of time. And with stability comes the trade of surplus goods between neighboring pastoral communities.

How are horticultural societies different from agricultural societies?

Horticultural societies occasionally produced a surplus, which permitted storage as well as the emergence of other professions not related to the survival of the society. Agricultural societies use technological advances to cultivate crops (especially grains like wheat, rice, corn, and barley) over a large area.

How is the consumption of materials affecting society?

The enlarged consumption of materials means that we will have to cope increasingly with natural-resource and supply problems.

What makes a postindustrial society different from other societies?

This revolution is creating a postindustrial society based on information, knowledge, and the selling of services. That is, rather than being driven by the factory production of goods, society is being shaped by the human mind, aided by computer technology.

Hence, pastoral societies are able to produce a surplus of goods, which makes storing food for future use a possibility. With storage comes the desire to develop settlements that permit the society to remain in a single place for longer periods of time. And with stability comes the trade of surplus goods between neighboring pastoral communities.

Horticultural societies occasionally produced a surplus, which permitted storage as well as the emergence of other professions not related to the survival of the society. Agricultural societies use technological advances to cultivate crops (especially grains like wheat, rice, corn, and barley) over a large area.

This revolution is creating a postindustrial society based on information, knowledge, and the selling of services. That is, rather than being driven by the factory production of goods, society is being shaped by the human mind, aided by computer technology.

How was labor divided in hunting and gathering societies?

Labor in hunting and gathering societies was divided equally among members. Because of the mobile nature of the society, these societies stored little in the form of surplus goods. Therefore, anyone who could hunt, fish, or gather fruits and vegetables did so. These societies probably also had at least some division of labor based on gender.