What is it about kids that Holden likes?

June 21, 2019 Off By idswater

What is it about kids that Holden likes?

By J. D. Salinger Holden loves kids, but not in a creepy way. Really. He just thinks they’re cute little bundles of hilarious innocence: genuine, caring, and naturally kindhearted. All we have to say is—wait until Lord of the Flies is published in a few years, Holden.

What does Holden say about childhood?

Holden’s life basically is an interaction of the two scenarios, which makes him a special case. In the first instance, he strives to be young forever. He does not want to be an adult, because he equates adulthood with “phoniness”. In contrast, he sees children as innocent, gentle and pure.

Why does Holden have an attitude?

Holden Caulfield He finds the hypocrisy and ugliness of the world around him almost unbearable, and through his cynicism he tries to protect himself from the pain and disappointment of the adult world. However, the criticisms that Holden aims at people around him are also aimed at himself.

What does Holden say about kids and adults sleeping?

In Chapter 21, Holden happens upon his little sister, Phoebe, sleeping peacefully in his brother D.B.’s room. After watching her, he decides that children always look very peaceful when they sleep, unlike adults. It makes sense that Holden would say this. Adults, he thinks, are very “phony” in general.

How did Holden lose his innocence?

In The Catcher in the Rye, Holden loses his innocence at the age of thirteen, when his brother, Allie, dies of leukemia. This strips away his sense that the world is safe or fair.

Why is Holden so obsessed with innocence?

In The Catcher in the Rye, Holden is so obsessed with innocence because the death of his younger brother, Allie, from leukemia was traumatic for him. Ever since that time, he has longed to protect others as he could not protect Allie and has yearned to recreate the innocent and safe world of childhood he remembers.

Does Holden Caulfield lose his virginity?

Holden Caulfield does not lose his virginity during the course of The Catcher in the Rye, though he makes some half-hearted attempts to do so.

What is wrong with Holden?

Holden Caulfield suffers from post traumatic stress disorder. The fictional cause is the death of his beloved little brother, Allie. The reason that The Catcher in the Rye is so powerful is that it is a true book (I don’t say that it is a true story). Salinger, himself, and Holden’s PTSD is Salinger’s PTSD.

What reason does Holden give for refusing to go to his oral expression?

In Chapter 24, after Holden explains that he’s failed his Oral Expression class because he liked to make digressions in his stories, Mr. Antolini wants to know more. Unlike other adult figures in the book, Mr. Antolini doesn’t simply dismiss Holden’s enjoyment of digressions as childish.

Why does Holden deny really knowing James?

Why does Holden think about James Castle when Phoebe asks him to name one thing that he likes a lot? Why does he deny really knowing James? He thinks about James because he is thinking about the cruelty in the world making him go crazy. It is a perfect example of how cruel people bully the weak people.

Why is Holden so obsessed with the ducks?

Why is Holden obsessed with the ducks at the Central Park Lagoon? Holden is obsessed with the ducks at the Central Park Lagoon because they symbolize youthful innocence while demonstrating that change isn’t permanent, and survival is possible even in the harshest environment.

Who does Holden think is innocent?

Holden cares deeply and wants to protect the childhood innocence of is Phoebe. One symbol that Salinger uses is in the title of the book.

What does Holden believe about adults and children in the Rye?

Certainly, Holden longs for the innocence and sensibleness that he believes existed in the past and in his childhood. For this reason, he wants to be a “catcher in the rye,” grabbing children before they fall over the cliff of adolescence into the hypocritical world of adults.

How does Holden’s attitude change as he grows?

Holden’s opinions of childhood and adulthood change as he grows through experience. Throughout the story Holden emphasizes his love for childhood innocence.

What does Holden Caulfield say about innocence in catcher in the Rye?

Throughout the story Holden emphasizes his love for childhood innocence. In a passage he says “The thing with kids is, if they want to grab for the golden ring, you have to let them do it, and not say anything.” (Salinger 211) This immediately points to his affinity for innocence and not having the limits of being and adult.

How does Holden feel about his sister Phoebe?

Holden not only appreciates the fact that they share similar tastes in entertainment but also values her listening skills. She is not overly judgmental, and she even looks up to him. Holden also enjoys her red hair, which reminds him of Allie. Overall, Phoebe is an intelligent, sympathetic younger sister who truly cares about Holden.

Certainly, Holden longs for the innocence and sensibleness that he believes existed in the past and in his childhood. For this reason, he wants to be a “catcher in the rye,” grabbing children before they fall over the cliff of adolescence into the hypocritical world of adults.

Why does Holden want to escape growing up?

He constantly dreams up schemes to escape growing up, such as fleeing to a New England cabin or working on a ranch out West. The only role that Holden envisions for himself in life—catching children before they fall off a cliff—is symbolic of his wish to save himself and other children from having to one day grow up.

How old is Holden Caulfield in the catcher in the Rye?

The Catcher in the Rye is a portrait of a young man at odds with the process of growing up. A 16-year-old who is highly critical of the adult world, Holden covets what he sees as the inherent purity of youth. This is why the characters he speaks most fondly about in the novel are all children.

What does Holden believe about adults and children in the Great Gatsby?

Holden Caulfield experiences a collision with the adult world that he finds existentially absurd. The insincerity, the superficiality, the hypocrisy, the falseness, the cruelty, and the charades of adults repulse and disappoint Holden, leaving him disillusioned.