Who represents Arizona in the Senate?

January 6, 2019 Off By idswater

Who represents Arizona in the Senate?

Mark Kelly (Democratic Party)
Kyrsten Sinema (Democratic Party)
Arizona/Senators

Who represents Arizona?

List of members and delegates

Member / Delegate Party Years
Ann Kirkpatrick Democratic January 3, 2019 – present
Jim Kolbe Republican January 3, 1985 – January 3, 2003
January 3, 2003 – January 3, 2007
Jon Kyl Republican January 3, 1987 – January 3, 1995

How many senators and representatives does Arizona have?

Arizona. Arizona is a U.S. state with two senators in the United States Senate and nine representatives in the United States House of Representatives.

Who was the first US Senator from Arizona?

Martha McSally (R) Arizona was admitted to the Union on February 14, 1912. U.S. Senators from Arizona belong to Class 1 and Class 3 and are popularly elected for a six-year term beginning January 3.

Who are the members of the US Senate?

Senators Senator’s Name State Party Class Office Room* Baldwin, Tammy Wisconsin Democratic 1 I SH-709 Barrasso, John Wyoming Republican 1 I SD-307 Bennet, Michael F. Colorado Democratic 3 III SR-261 Blackburn, Marsha Tennessee Republican 1 I SD-357

Why are there two senators per state in the US?

Larger states have much greater influence in the House of Representatives due to their populations. The Framers could, I suppose, have just settled on 1 Senator per state, thereby fulfilling the goal of providing a place where small states would be equal in influence to large.

Who are the current senators of the state of Arizona?

The state’s current U.S. senators are Democrat Kyrsten Sinema and Republican Martha McSally, both serving since 2019, making it one of nine states to have a split United States Senate delegation. Class 1 U.S. senators belong to the electoral cycle who were elected for three Congresses in the state’s first election of 1912.

How many congressmen are in AZ?

Arizona is a U.S. state with two senators in the United States Senate and nine representatives in the United States House of Representatives.

Larger states have much greater influence in the House of Representatives due to their populations. The Framers could, I suppose, have just settled on 1 Senator per state, thereby fulfilling the goal of providing a place where small states would be equal in influence to large.